an4aa curatorial series 2022

an4aa curatorial series 2022

Art Gallery of South Australia 

Russell Kelty

on Pure Form: Japanese Sculptural Ceramics held 05.12.2022-05.11.2022 at the

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Friday, 5 AUGUST 2022, 1.00–2.00pm (AEST)

About the Speaker

Russell Kelty is Curator of Asian Art at the Art Gallery of South Australia, where he has curated and contributed to major exhibitions and catalogues, including Pure Form: Japanese sculptural ceramics (2022), Samurai transformed (2019 - 2020), Chiharu Shiota: Embodied (2018), Ever blossoming: The flower in Japanese art and culture (2016) and Treasure Ships: Art in the Age of Spices (2015-2016). He is currently a doctoral candidate at the University of Sydney researching the depiction of foreign ships by Japanese artists during the Edo period (1615-1868).

About the Exhibition 

Today, Japan has one of the most dynamic ceramic cultures in the world. This vibrant culture is in part due to a transformation which began in the post-war years as young avant-garde ceramicists largely based in Kyoto utilised clay for personal expression

and in the process created non-functional, sculptural, ceramic objects. The monumental shift initiated by groups like Shikōkai and Sōdeisha liberated subsequent generations of ceramicists from the well-established hierarchies of taste and methods of creation. The result was a world-leading shift in ceramic expression, positioning contemporary Japanese works at the forefront of international modernism, which continues to resonate with ceramicists today.

 

Pure form: Japanese sculptural ceramics presents the rich diversity of sculptural ceramics created by men and women from the late 1940s to the present on loan from public and private collections across Australia. It is the first exhibition of its kind in Australia to present this compelling narrative and includes a kaleidoscopic array of over one hundred works of art by sixty-five Japanese ceramicists.

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IMAGE: Kawakami Rikizō, born Kyoto, 1935, Wall series 1988 – 2012, c. 1988, Kyoto, stoneware, 28.0 x 29.0 x 29.0 cm; Collection of Raphy Star. Photo by Grant Hancock

Min-Jung Kim

Min-Jung Kim

on Five Hundred Arhats of Changnyeongsa Temple at the Powerhouse Museum held 02.12.2021-15.05.2022 at the Powerhouse Museum

on Five Hundred Arhats of Changnyeongsa Temple at the Powerhouse Museum held 02.12.2021-15.05.2022 at the Powerhouse Museum

Friday, 13 MAY 2022, 1.00–2.00pm (AEST)

CLICK HERE TO SEE RECORDING OF THE EVENT

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About the Speaker

Min-Jung Kim is Curator of Asian Arts and Design at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney, Australia. Born and trained in South Korea, she is particularly interested in cross-cultural interpretation of museum collections and was the winner of the 2012 ICOM Australia Award for International Relations. She has published and lectured widely on Korean textiles, ceramics and metalworks, and Japanese fashion including edited book, Spirit of Jang-in: Treasures of Korean Metal Craft. Selected exhibitions she worked include Rapt in Colour (1998), Earth, Spirit, Fire (2000), Spirit of jang-in (2011), Japanese folds (2015) and Reflections of Asia (2018). Currently, She is working on a Chinese toggles exhibition and publication which will be a collaborative project between the Powerhouse Museum and Chau Chak Wing Museum, University of Sydney.

About the Exhibition 

The Five Hundred Arhats were discovered in 2001–02 among the ruins of the Changnyeongsa temple in Yeongwol, Gangwon-do Province in South Korea and are believed to be around 800 years old.

 

This exhibition features one Buddha and 50 arhat statues with lifelike expressions, from joy and serenity to anger and sorrow: the gamut of human emotion. Incorporated into an installation created by artist Kim Seung Young made up of more than 1000 audio speakers the exhibition suggests the arhats are meditating in an attitude of intimate, reclusive poise amidst a cacophony that evokes the distracting bustle of urban life.

 

Produced in collaboration with the Chuncheon National Museum of Korea the exhibition serves as a poignant reminder that each of us is a noble being with the potential to attain enlightenment.

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IMAGE: Exhibition view of Five Hundred Arhat of Changnyeongsa Temple, Powerhouse Museum, Photo by Zan Wimberley 

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Yin Cao

on The Way We Eat held 21.03.2021-22.06.2022 at the Art Gallery of NSW

Friday, 6 MAY 2022, 1.00–2.00pm (AEST)

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About the Speaker

Yin Cao has been the Curator of Chinese Art at AGNSW since August 2011. Prior to that she was the Deputy Director at the Arthur M. Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University, Beijing, China, and a researcher at the University Museum of the National University of Singapore. Trained as an archaeologist at Peking University and Harvard University, she has participated several archaeological excavations both in China and Israel. She received museum management training at the Smithsonian Institution and the Freer/Sackler Gallery in Washington, DC.  She has curated several exhibitions including: the inaugural exhibition at the Arthur M. Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University (1993); “A Silk Road Saga-the sarcophagus of Yu Hong” (2013), and “Tang: treasures from the Silk Road capital” (2016, “Heaven and earth in Chinese art: treasures from the National Palace Museum, Taipei” (2019), and “The way we eat” (2021). She has edited and written catalogues for these exhibitions. She is on the Board of the Museum of Chinese in Australia.

About the Exhibition 

The Way We Eat brings together works of art related to food – that ancient source of inspiration, pleasure and anxiety. Historical treasures and dramatic contemporary artworks in a range of media are displayed under four themes: ‘Essential’, ‘Exchange’, ‘Excess’ and ‘Enchanted’. These themes consider how food is made, stored and consumed; the evolution of culinary wares; cultural exchange; and the ritual and symbolic meanings of food.

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IMAGE: Installation view The Way We Eat  Photograph: Yin Cao