Postgraduate Workshop: Asian Art Research Now 

18 November 2022, 9am-5:10pm

Zoom Online Meeting/Seminar 

**DIRECT ZOOM LINK TO JOIN EVENT - CLICK HERE** 

 

Now in its fifth year Asian Art Research Now has now become the flagship event of the Australasian Network for Asian Art (an4aa), a collegial group of Australian and New Zealand researchers who have come together to strengthen a sense of scholarly community in this field. An4aa's objective is to highlight the vitality and immediacy of Asian art research being undertaken by emerging scholars, and showcase the work of recent PhD graduates and current PhD students. The day-long workshop seeks to foster supportive critique and generate conversations across institutional boundaries, as well as those of geography and temporality within the field of Asian art history.

Convened by the Australasian Network for Asian Art (an4aa) in conjunction with Asian Art Research at the University of Melbourne (AAR) and Asia: Innovation and Transformation at Australian National University (AIT).

 

For detailed information on each session, including paper abstracts, click the titles of each session below

Keynote panel: Studying Asian art in Australia in 2022
9:00am-10:10am AEDT

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Dr James Nguyen

James Nguyen is Việt settler in Narrm (Melbourne). His videos and collaborations help him to make endless talk about art. From the diasporic absurd to structural mischief, anything, and everything is up for grabs.

James has a PhD on decolonising broken languages at UNSW, an MFA on the cinematic body at the University of Sydney, a Bachelor of Arts from the National Art School, a Bachelor of Pharmacy from Charles Sturt University and a collaborative fellowship at UnionDocs (Centre for Documentary Arts) NYC. He continues to present successful and lacklustre exhibitions both locally and internationally.

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Dr Minerva Inwald

Minerva Inwald is a historian of modern China, with particular expertise in the cultural history of the Mao era (1949–1976). Minerva received her PhD from the Department of History at The University of Sydney in 2019 and is currently Judith Neilson Post-doctoral Fellow in Contemporary Art at UNSW, Sydney. Her interdisciplinary research combines historical and art historical methods, using the visual arts as a lens to examine historical concepts of creativity and expertise in the People’s Republic of China. Minerva is the creator of the digital humanities project Mao in Multiple (maoinmultiple.com), a tool that allows users to explore the relationship between the visual arts and material culture in the People’s Republic of China. She is co-author of the book Floating Time: Chinese Prints, 1954–2002 (Power Publications, 2016) and co-curator of the exhibitions Provocations: Avant-Garde Art in China in the 1980s (Fisher Library, The University of Sydney, 2017–2018) and Floating Time: Chinese Prints, 1954–2002 (University Art Gallery, The University of Sydney, Sydney, 2016).

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Dr Elly Kent

Dr Elly Kent is the editor of New Mandala and Deputy Director of the Australian National University Indonesia Institute. She has worked as a researcher, writer, translator, artist, teacher and intercultural professional over 20 years in academia and the arts in Indonesia and Australia. Elly is the author of Artists and the People: Ideologies of Indonesian Art (2022) NUS Press, and co-editor (with Virginia Hooker and Caroline Turner) of Living Art: Indonesian Artists Engage Politics, Society and History (2022) ANU Press. In 2023 she will join University of New South Wales as a Lecturer in Indonesian Studies.

Fiona McConnell (University of Melbourne) 

Book'n'things: Tradition and Innovation in the Art of 'Chaekgeori' from Joseon Korea 

Maria Karageorge (University of Sydney) 

Beauties For Export? Challenging Images of Women in Reverse-Glass Paintings 

Darren Tanny Tan (Victorian College of the Arts)

By A Thousand Cuts: Wounding the Historical Image 

Ryoko Kose (RMIT University)

Being Keepers

Chris Berthelsen (University of Auckland)

The potential(s) of Tojisha-Kenkyu for generating new creative practice?

Thao Nguyen (RMIT University)

Activating Textile(s)

Bianca Winataputri (Monash University) 

'Resonance' as art historical methodology 

Aulia Yeru (University of New South Wales)

Rethreading Flow of Change of Cikapundung River

Jennifer Yang (University of Sydney)

Intersections of the historical and the contemporary in the art of Tintin Wulia

Caitlin Hughes (University of Melbourne)

Views from the South: Re/Situations in contemporary Makassar art

Genevieve Trail (University of Melbourne)

The artwork is a set of related transactions: Structuralist Performance, Hong Kong, 1980-1989

Lu Guan (RMIT University)

Change of Perceptions: Online-Only Asian Art Auctions

Hilal Ahmad Khan (Jamia Millia Islamia University)

South Asia: Visual Arts, Technology, and its different expositions

Nasibeh Ghasri Khouzzani (Australian National University)

The Dilemma of Self-Censorship: Contemporary Diasporic Iranian Artists